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Tea and sympathy

Whenever our right becomes the guiding factor of our lives, it dulls our spiritual insight. The greatest enemy of the life of faith in God is not sin, but good choices which are not quite good enough. The good is always the enemy of the best.

Oswald Chambers, My Utmost for His Highest (25 May,"The Good or The Best?")


Up early, which brings the hope of an end to my terrible moodiness. It's been pretty bad, with times when I can't feel much of anything but shades of anger or sadness. Can't do a lot about those emotions or the circumstances behind them (when I know them). And the things I can do—trust my Father and pray—I don't. No wonder I haven't been doing well.

So now I have my tea and a few moments of quiet. One of the worst parts of my foul disposition is the way it obscures the many things for which I may be grateful. The oratorio premier Sunday was fantastic. I was moved to tears by the beauty of the work. As I mentioned to pinkroo that night (nice to meet you!), if that oratorio isn't sung by the chorus of Heaven, I'll be very surprised.

The new apartment is something else for which I'm thankful (stresses and all), as well as my friends, with whom I've spent more time lately. I long for more connection in relationship than I've had recently—someone who gets me—but that's not in my control, and I need to take and appreciate what I have rather than only mourning what I don't.

I have three wedding invitations and a graduation announcement on my desk. There is much to be celebrated.

Memorial Day is coming, and I'm not sure how to remember you anymore.

Comments

"The greatest enemy of the life of faith in God is not sin, but good choices which are not quite good enough. The good is always the enemy of the best."

Indeed.

Congrats on the new apartment!
"The greatest enemy of the life of faith in God is not sin, but good choices which are not quite good enough. The good is always the enemy of the best."

This does not make sense to me. I know the author is trying to use what appears obvious while postulating the opposite in order to make the point more dramatically, but I just don't buy the statement. To me, sin is the greatest enemy of the life of faith in God. We are human and therefore imperfect so all our choices will be not good enough. There is no room for hope in the statement and Hope is one of the cardinal virtues.
Doesn't hope entail, or even require, the possibility of God giving us the best as we follow Him and seek His Kingdom? Or is hope fulfilled by the good that is not the best? For me, hope that settles at the level of the good of my independent choices is a very limited virtue indeed.

Hope that is centered in God includes and requires good beyond my reach. Indeed, my very salvation, justification, and sanctification are each prime examples—were I limited to my ability, I would be doomed.

From: pecosbill Date: May 27th, 2004 - 01:30 pm (Link)


I certainly agree about hope requiring good beyond our reach. I'm just thinking that the Chambers statement leads to puzzling logical conclusions. For example, one could decide to revive a dormant prayer life, struggle to do it with moderate success (a good choice not good enough) and according to the statement, that would be a greater enemy to a life of faith than miring one's self in pornography (sin). Am I misapprehending the statement?
Sometimes you talk as though you always think you should be happy and chirpy. Do you? The Bible talks a lot about suffering - it doesn't deny its reality. I'm always terrified of squashing my emotions, I guess. I've done too much of that in my own life.
Oh good Lord, no. That actually made me laugh. I'm afraid I've been misperceived; I couldn't be much farther from happy and chirpy, nor do I find that a good aspiration in and of itself. Bleh.

What I don't want to be is ungrateful, because then I can almost guarantee I'm not understanding my life or my Lord rightly.

Happy Moving Day!!!

:)