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Cleaning up

There was one repressed do-gooder
And a few who still believed
Yes I think there were five good men here yesterday
But they were asked to leave
So we've kept the good old vices
And laboured to invent a few
With cake in vulgar surplus
We can have it and eat it, too

—Toy Matinee, "Last Plane Out"


Yesterday, I watched Amélie for the first time. I'd heard wonderful things about it, and while it was well-crafted and often enjoyable, I was disappointed that a tale about the discovery of love culminated in an unmarried couple (who barely know one another, to boot) having sex. Film is art— I'm not trying to dictate what an artist should or shouldn't say. Love is more to me than this, however, and my heart hates to see it so cheapened. It's likewise cheapened in the real world all too often, and that makes me deeply sad.

God intended so much more— how little we trust Him to teach us about love.

(I also dreamed in French last night, which was frustrating, since I don't speak it. Today it has downsized to just thinking in a French accent.)

Many people might be disturbed to open their door in the morning and find "Warning: Asbestos" tape and plastic sheeting wrapped over the door across the hall, but not I. In addition to being in a perpetual state of orange alert, my old career gave me enough of a passing knowlege of asbestos abatement to not be overly concerned. Earlier this week, I learned from my apartment manager that my apartment was built for the boiler tender, back when the furnace for the building was coal powered (which explains why it's the only basement apartment and why it's located directly across from the boiler room). All this to say, there's nothing to worry about.

Great staff meeting this morning; Enterprise tonight with taci, Connor, and Sara. Perhaps I'll write more afterward. There's more on my mind.

Comments

(Anonymous)

Amelie

i dont think they were trying cheapen the meaning of love. rather, i think it was to encourage for us to love others constantly....and be selfless...yet at the same time..its okay to say you want to be loved.

Re: Amelie

See, I agree with you– no one was trying to cheapen love. They did so, however, by concluding that the ultimate way for Amélie to receive love was by having sex with a man she wasn't married to and hardly knew. As a Christian, I must take issue with the portrayal of "love" as something outside the plan of the Author of love. Indeed, if He is love (as Christians believe), then this must be something less.

The themes were beautiful. The means were ugly. We are intended for so much more than this, yet we seek our own way to love– as if we believe He means to withhold it from us.

Re: Amelie

I agree - While I enjoyed the movie for the very extraordinarily quirky aspects (you should know by now I'm quirky myself) and there were scenes I absolutely loved (like when she got revenge on the mean storekeeper for his rude behavior and cruel treatment of the handicapped employee) I have to admit the ending just fell completely flat for me. It turned a movie I might have wanted to watch over and over and over into something I only care to see once in a while.
The soundtrack is not sex filled and is a must have plastic spinning disk

(Anonymous)

Amelie

Yeah...i see what you meant..=P maybe they should have just ended teh movie when she opened the door at the end...what else can you expect from movies these days....
(I also dreamed in French last night, which was frustrating, since I don't speak it. Today it has downsized to just thinking in a French accent.)

THAT, my friend, is enormously funny.
I frequently think in a southern accent for hours after getting off the phone with unblinkable.

I also dreamed in French last night, which was frustrating, since I don't speak it. Today it has downsized to just thinking in a French accent

LOL! Oh, that cracks me up!